The Cross-Border Biotech Blog

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Tag Archives: Quebec Platelet Disorder

Friday Science Review: March 5, 2010

Missing Enzyme Improves Metabolism: Mice lacking the TGH gene for the enzyme triacylglycerol hydrolase showed an unexpected dramatic improvement in their metabolic profile.  TGH is an enzyme that helps to release stored fat or triglycerides into the blood stream where it circulates to be used as an energy source or, if in excess, ends up being stored at tissue sites that do not normally store fat depots.  This contributes to cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and liver dysfunction.  Researchers were correct in hypothesizing that deleting TGH would prevent this from happening but they were surprised to discover global metabolic benefits.  These mice not only have better lipid profiles but they also burn more fat and are also more physically active compared to mice that have the enzyme.  Additional research is required but this study demonstrates the potential of TGH as a therapeutic target for lowering blood lipid levels and likely other related benefits in humans.  The study was led Dr. Richard Lehner and his team at the University of Alberta and is published in this month’s issue of Cell Metabolism.

Gene Duplication Causes Bleeding Disorder: The genetic cause of the rare blood clotting disorder, Quebec Platelet Disorder (QPD) was recently discovered by researchers at McMaster University.  QPD is caused by a mutation involving an extra copy of the gene encoding the enzyme urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), resulting in an overproduction of the enzyme that accelerates blood clot breakdown.  This transforms blood platelets from clot forming to clot busters.   A genetic test for the mutation, the first gene duplication mutation causing a bleeding disorder, is in development and will be an invaluable diagnostic tool.  Dr. Catherine Hayward led the discovery team and their study is published in the journal Blood.

Blocking Metabolic Genes: Prox1 is the newest player in the control of our body’s energy balance.  It binds to and inhibits two well known transcription factors for metabolic genes, estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) and proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha).  These are significant findings along the long road to understanding the complex regulation and homeostasis of our metabolic system.  Dr. Vincent Giguère and his team at McGill University’s new Goodman Cancer Centre describe their work in the latest issue of Genes and Development.

Molecular Clues to Chemotherapy Resistance: Scientists at The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research knocked out a specific isoform of the p73 protein family, DeltaNp73, to try to delineate the specific function of this protein.  They discovered a novel function whereby the DeltaNp73 protein targets the DNA damage site and partners with another protein, 53BP1, to block the subsequent DNA damage molecular response pathway involving p53.  This has significance in explaining chemotherapy resistance in human tumors with high levels of DeltaNp73 expression.  Dr. Tak Mak reports the study in Genes and Development.

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