The Cross-Border Biotech Blog

Biotechnology, Health and Business in Canada, the United States and Worldwide

Tag Archives: PubMed

PubMed Central Canada Opens for Business: Free Online Access to Life Sciences Journals

The PubMed Central Canada project (noted here last July) is now open for business at http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/ This collaboration — between the NRC’s Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and the U.S. National Library of Medicine — “aims to provide a freely accessible, Canada-based archive of biomedical and health research findings.”

It also allows CIHR-funded researchers to comply with the Institute’s Policy on Access to Research Outputs, which requires grantees to make their peer-reviewed publications freely accessible online within six months of publication. There’s a login-based manuscript submission system, but since I’m not CIHR funded, I can’t check it out. If you are, and you do, let us know how it works.

Bookmark and Share

PubMed Central Comes to Canada (or vice-versa?)

PumMed Central LogoIf you ever read scientific publications, but you don’t have institutional journal subscriptions, you definitely know and love PubMed Central, the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) online repository of free-access full-text papers. Well, get ready for So You Think You Can Publish Canada PubMed Central Canada!

CIHR and the NRC’s Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information are partnering with NLM to establish PMC Canada, which follows UK PubMed Central (UKPMC) as PubMed Central expands internationally:

“PMC Canada will be a national digital repository of peer-reviewed health and life sciences literature, including research resulting from CIHR funding. This searchable Web-based repository will be permanent, stable and freely accessible. … PMC Canada will include a manuscript submission system to enable CIHR-funded researchers to deposit articles that are accepted for publication by peer reviewed journals.”

This initiative has been under way for some time, but it serves as a way to implement CIHR’s recently announced Policy on Access to Research Outputs, under which grant recipients are required to ensure that their peer reviewed publications are freely accessible online within six months of publication.  The NIH has a similar policy, with a 12-month window.

Bookmark and Share

Wednesday Brain Dump: February 11, 2009

Deep Appreciation:for Phillip Terrence Ragon, founder and sole proprietor of database-software provider InterSystems who donated $100 million to establish a research institute that focuses on expediting the development of an AIDS vaccine, and to Pfizer Canada which contributed a further $2 million to British Columbia’s Center for Drug Research and Development (CDRD); and The State of Georgia is contemplating a $180 million bioscience research park.

Social Agitation: French scientists decided their street protests were their best approach to halting the government’s science and higher education reforms and rejected mediation.

Better Cogitation:Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) shows neuroprotective effects in animal models of Alzheimers’, but it won’t stop cries of ‘brain drain’ following Canada’s 2009 Budget.

Free Publication: ScienceInsider reports that Rep. Conyers’ (D-MI) bill that would eliminate free full-text publication of NIH-funded research is back on the table this session.

Self Regulation:More Pharma companies are implementing voluntary disclosure of physician payments (under threat of legislation); and some researchers are taking steps to prevent disclosures of potentially harmful research (under threat of annihilation).

Reconsideration: Researchers at Emory decided that flu pandemic deaths in 1918 may have been primarily from bacterial superinfections rather than the virus itself; Icahn decided to nominate another slate of Biogen-Idec directors; Everybody decided to take another look at their luciferase screening assay controls; and the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) decided to take another look at payment for PSA testing for prostate cancer detection.

Bookmark and Share

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 131 other followers