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Biotechnology, Health and Business in Canada, the United States and Worldwide

Tag Archives: prostate cancer

Friday Science Review: March 12, 2010

Good viruses, bad viruses, biomarkers and protein structures in this week’s research highlights…

Biomarker for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Subset: Using a high-throughput genomic approach to associate gene expression profile with treatment outcomes for Hodgkin lymphoma, researchers identified an overexpression of genes typically expressed by macrophages in samples from patients who had experienced a relapse after treatment.  This was confirmed histologically by looking at stained tissue samples and tallying the number of macrophages – high numbers of macrophages are associated with treatment resistance in Hodgkin lymphoma.  About 25% of patients fall into this category where a biomarker test could shuttle them into a more aggressive or experimental treatment option and may prevent them from being exposed to the side effects of primary treatments that are likely to fail.  The study, led by B.C. Cancer Agency researcher Dr. Randy Gascoyne, is reported in The New England Journal of Medicine with an editorial that is touting this as the “breakthrough we have been looking for.”

Immune System Boost for HIV Patients:  A very important molecular discovery may give a boost to restoring immune function in HIV infected patients.  Renowned HIV scientist, Dr. Rafick-Pierre Sékaly, and his cross-border research teams at the Université de Montréal and Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute of Florida identified that the protein PD-1 is up-regulated by the release of bacterial products from the gut.  Another factor, IL-10, is subsequently increased and together this is what shuts down the CD4+ T-cell immune system in HIV patients.  Therefore, the scientists suggest that new immunotherapies should aim to block PD-1 and IL-10 to help restore the debilitated immune system in HIV infected patients.  The research article appears in this week’s Nature Medicine.

Not All Viruses are Bad: The ubiquitous reovirus has oncolytic actions against different types of cancer when used as a therapeutic approach.  Now, prostate cancer may be added to the growing list of cancers, which includes ovarian, breast, pancreatic and gliomas, that may be treated with a reovirus based strategy.  In fact, the Calgary-based Oncolytics Biotech Inc. technology platform and pipeline are based on the reovirus and contributed to the prostate study.  In the prostate cancer clinical study, a viral concoction was injected into prostate cancer nodules and three weeks later, the prostates were resected.  There was evidence of cancer cell death and overall, the procedure was deemed safe with only mild side effects experienced by the patients.  The success of this pilot study should draw interest to expand the clinical trial novel treatment for prostate cancer.  Dr. Donald Morris led the research and medical team at the University of Calgary and reports the study in Cancer Research.

Having Fun with Names: This study provides more molecular and structural details than you probably need to know but I want to point out the cool protein domain name: Really Interesting New Gene or RING domain.  It is an important component of a group of proteins that regulate the potent oncogene called eIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor).  The details of the Université de Montréal study are described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Pump It Up: Another structural study that I want to point out because of its importance: the V-ATPase.  This is a membrane proton pump that controls the acidity of the cellular environment and can play critical roles for the cell in promoting a diseased state.  SickKids Research Instiute scientist, Dr. John Rubinstein explains “In some types of cancer, the pumps are “hijacked” to acidify the external environment of tumours, allowing the cancer to invade surrounding tissues and spread throughout the body.  The cells that take up bone minerals also use V-ATPases to dissolve bone, a process that must be limited in treating osteoporosis.”  More details on the study are found here in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Paradoxical Signalling Interaction: The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway is a well studied signaling module and its aberrant activity is implicated in a number of diseases including cancer.  It is also the target of a handful of therapeutic drugs currently under study or in trials.  However, the new study led by Dr. Deborah Anderson at the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency throws a new twist into the pathway.  Their data identifies a paradoxical interaction between the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K and the PTEN phosphatase enzyme since these two enzymes have opposing actions.  This is certainly food for thought for researchers in this field to rethink their signalling models.  A recent news article headlines this study as the “on switch” for cancer cell growth but it is really a much more complicated puzzle than that.  The data is presented in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Friday Science Review: October 2, 2009

Prostate cancer and H1N1 updates…

Nanotechnology is Coming:  A research study by a group of University of Toronto engineers, nanoscientists, and pharmaceutical specialists has garnered a lot of media attention this week describing the use of nanomaterials in microchip technology to create a highly sensitive biosensor.  In the more technical report published in Nature Nantotechnology this week, they describe a special nanostructuring technique arranged in an array architechture to expand the dynamic range and sensitivity of the system for nucleic acid and protein biodetection.  The microchip is small, fast, and super sensitive.

In an earlier publication in ACS Nano, they applied their nanotechnology to detect prostate cancer biomarkers.  They demonstrated the accuracy, sensitivity and speed of the non-invasive test, which they are trying to package into a small hand-held device that can readily conduct testing at the point-of-care.  Of course, the application of this technology goes far beyond prostate cancer and can be adapted to detect other cancer biomarkers, HIV and other diseases.   Nanomaterial, nanotechnology, nanomedicine – these are hot words that you will hear about more frequently in the near future.

The research was lead by University of Toronto scientists, Drs. Shana Kelley and Ted Sargent.  A spinoff company based on the molecular diagnostic platform, tentatively called GenEplex, is in the works with the support of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research’s Intellectual Property Development and Commercialization Program.  Also, the Ontario Genomics Institute is funding a microRNA application of the technology to the tune of almost $1 million.

In other prostate cancer research news:

Targeting IGF-1R:  Researchers targeted the Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) with antisense technology to suppress IGF-1R expression in prostate cancer cells.  They found that by inhibiting IGF-1R signaling activity, the cancer cells grew more slowly but also increased their rate of cell death.  This is the first preclinical proof-of-principal that antisense therapy targeting IGF-1R in prostate cancer may be a viable treatment route and warrants further investigation.

The study was conducted by Dr. Michael Cox at the Vancouver Prostate Centre and published in this week’s editon of The Prostate.

Fatty Acids Promote Prostate Cancer: The hormone androgen, and its androgen receptor partner, have been shown to contribute to prostate cancer progression.  In this research report, researchers at the University of British Columibia suggest that elevated fatty acid (arachadonic acid) levels in the tumors may lead to increased activation of steroid hormone synthesis and contribute to the progression of the cancer.  Therefore, they recommended that fatty acid pathways should also be targeted as part of a therapeutic approach to treating prostate cancer.

Dr. Colleen Nelson led the research team at the Vancouver Prostate Centre and published the report also in this week’s edition of The Prostate.

H1N1 Update: Following last week’s “seasonal flu vs. swine flu” vaccination story, the Public Health Agency of Canada reviewed their own data and soon declared their position on the yet unpublished study saying that “there is no link between having a seasonal flu shot and developing a severe bout of pandemic flu.”  More to follow on this as the controversial study should become public next week.

In other H1N1 news:

Big Pharma gets Immunity: As increasing H1N1 cases emerge and Health Canada is being encouraged to expedite the approval of H1N1 vaccines, the Public Health Agency of Canada is following other countries in stating that they will protect GlaxoSmithKline, the maker of the vaccine, from any lawsuits arising from potential side effects.

Surgical Masks are Adequate: Healthcare workers should be encouraged by a study comparing standard surgical masks versus N95 respirator in protecting against flu viruses (swine included).  In the randomized controlled study, conducted by flu expert Dr. Mark Loeb at McMaster University, 446 nurses from eight hospitals in Ontario were equally distributed to wear either sugical masks or fit-tested N95s.  The results showed that there was an insignificant difference (23.6%, surgical mask vs. 22.9%, N95) in the number who contract the ‘flu’ during the course of the season.  However, this study is sure to raise more debate within the healthcare community as unpublished work in China found that N95 masks can cut the risk of catching the flu virus by 75% while surgical masks offer no protective effect.  Dr. Loeb’s study is published in the early edition of JAMA.   A commentary on this issue is also provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Benefits of Handwashing? And if you are not confused enough about how to avoid catching the virus, consider this article in CMAJ questioning the benefits, due to lack of scientific evidence, of hand washing in preventiing the transmission of influenza viruses.

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