The Cross-Border Biotech Blog

Biotechnology, Health and Business in Canada, the United States and Worldwide

Tag Archives: Mount Sinai

Monday Biotech Deal Review: January 11, 2010

The busy pace for Canadian biotech deals set at the end of 2009 continues into 2010. After the jump, 3 licensing agreements, 6 securities deals (though it’s 5 closing, one launching) and a PMA.  You may even find redemption if you Read more of this post

Friday Science Review: August 14, 2009

Great stuff this week in Canadian science news…

A GIFT for MS patients:  An experimental treatment tested in mice with multiple sclerosis was able to reverse the disorder with few side effects.   The new compound is called GIFT15 – a hybrid protein between GSM-CSF and Interleukin-15.  Surprisingly, it produces results that you would not expect from the action of the individual proteins.  GIFT15 causes B-cells to switch from immune responsive into immune-suppressive regulatory cells and this forces MS into remission.  The treatment method takes B-cells from the individual and exposes them in vitro to GIFT15 to convert them to regulatory B-cells before they are injected back into the patient – a form of personalized medicine.

As always, one should be cautious as these experiments were tested in mice and it is unknown how humans would respond .  It does, however, present a new approach to finding a treatment regime for MS and may also lead to similar therapies for other autoimmune disorders.

Dr. Jacques Galipeau led the study at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, McGill University and it is presented in the early on-line edition of Nature Medicine.

An Epilepsy gene discovery:  A mouse that experiences seizures was identified in a mutagenesis screen that led to the discovery of an inactivating mutation in the Atp1a3 gene encoding the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha3 isoform protein.  It is a sodium-potassium transporter protein having important roles in maintaining the electrochemical gradient across cell membranes.  When the mutant gene was augmented with a wild type Atp1a3 gene by breeding the mutant mouse with a transgenic mouse expressing normal Atp1a3, the protein function was rescued and more importantly, the seizures subsided completely.  The human ATP1A3 is almost identical to the mouse protein and studies are underway to try to find a similar mutation in patients.

Dr. Roder’s group at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto published these results in PNAS this week.

New forensic DNA extraction tool:  High quality nucleic acids can now be extracted from the smallest sample size or from highly contaminated samples.  The technology is based on the electrical properties of nucleic acids rather than on the chemical properties that traditional purification methods are based on.  It uses a novel electrophoresis technology called SCODA (Synchronous Coefficient of Drag Alteration), a fancy name for a type of rotating electrical field that selectively acts on long, charged polymers (e.g. DNA).  This electrical field will concentrate DNA while separating it from contaminants.

The research was performed by the biophysics team led by Dr. Andre Marziali at the University of British Columbia.  They have already teamed up with UBC spin-off company, Boreal Genomics to package the technology into a cool-looking device called the Aurora.  It is not surprising that it has garnered a lot of interest from law enforcement groups in Canada and the U.S.   Of course, there are a number of other applications for this technology such as in clinical research for the early detection of diseases or infections.

The research is described in a PNAS paper that will be coming out very soon but here is the UBC press release.  A great example of “Today’s Canadian science = tomorrow’s Canadian start-ups” (…if you caught the tweet last week).

Wow!  Canadians are on a roll… more research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Here are the headlines:

Dr. Jeffery Wrana’s team (Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute) describes how this signaling pathway is involved in breast cancer metastasis.

Dr. Uzonna (University of Manitoba) reports on why in some cases, vaccination against Leishmaniasis (a parasitic disease) can actually make them more susceptible to future infections.

Dr. Brisson (Université de Montréal) studies the Whirly protein – need I say more?

Dr. Barry Honda (Simon Fraser University) uses Drosophila to help us better understand O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), which has been implicated in a number of processes including insulin signaling, neurodegenerative disease and cellular stress response.

Dr. Zatorre (Université de Montréal) breaks down how our brain processes sound and suggests that it is similar to the visual system of our brain.

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Weekend Science Review: Abba Edition

Pinky and the BrainTake a Chance on Rats:  Fiona Zeeb in Catharine Winstanley’s lab at UBC has created a rat experimental model for gambling that attracted some news coverage.  Unlike previous rat gambling experiments, this model responds to human physiological moderators of gambling behaviour, like serotonergic and dopaminergic agents, suggesting that it will be a useful system for future investigations.  Here’s the (free) full paper from this week’s Neuropsychopharmacology.

Thank You for the GWAS: A study led by Katherine Siminovich (cross-appointed (at least) at U of T, Mount Sinai and the Liver Center at Toronto Western Hospital) was published in The New England Journal of Medicine this week identifying 13 loci across the HLA class II region that were associated with primary biliary cirrhosis.

Does Your Mother Know (there’s no obvious link between fibrinolytic defects and the risk of ovarian cancer):  A PLoS One paper authored by Yaakov Bentov in Robert Casper’s lab at the Lunenfeld dismantles one widely speculated etiology of ovarian cancer.  The hypothesis — “that the inefficient removal of the blood clots and fibrin products which are deposited in the vicinity of the ovary by retrograde menstruation might be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer” — was not disproven, but none of the functional variants in the fibrinolytic sytem examined by Bentov et al. showed any significant association with risk of ovarian cancer.

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