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Tag Archives: malaria

Friday Science Review: February 19, 2010

Hunks and pigs highlight this week’s research wrap-up…

HUNKs Stop Cancer Metastasis: Researchers screening tumour cells found that expression of the enzyme HUNK (Hormonally Up-regulated Neu-associated Kinase) is significantly lower in cancers.  When they reconstituted HUNK into metastatic cancer cells, it decreased their metastastic potential when tested in mouse cancer models.  Its actions block the association of PP2A and cofilin-1 and prevent the formation of actin filaments, which are key skeletal proteins involved in the cell migration process.  Dr. Tak Mak led the research team at the Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research and published the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Malaria Research Gets Genomic Help: A genome-wide study on the parasite Plasmodium falciparum should help researchers in the hunt for new drugs against malaria.  The genome of 189 malaria samples from around the world were decoded and analyzed to try to identify key genes that are responsible for the parasite’s propensity to evolve and become resistant to currently available drug treatments.  These data are invaluable for the design of future therapeutic approaches.  An international team was co-led by Dr. Philip Awadalla at the Université de Montréal and reports their work in the current issue of Nature Genetics.

Genetic Clues to Diabetes: Using a genome-wide association approach, 13 SNPs concentrated in 4 genetic regions were identified to be strongly correlated with glycemic control in type 1 diabetes.  For example, SORCS1 is strongly associated with hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) and BNC2 is correlated with eye and kidney complications.  This study is a first for suggesting that there may be a genetic contribution to the individual’s ability to control blood glucose levels.  The Hospital for Sick Children’s Dr. Andrew Paterson led the study, which appears in the journal Diabetes.

Porky Pig to the Rescue: Scientists revealed a significant advantage to transplanting porcine pancreatic islet cells as a therapeutic for diabetes.  In contrast to using human islet cells, porcine derived cells do not result in the formation of islet amyloids, which allows them to continue functioning properly for the long term.  They attribute this porcine advantage to differences in the sequences of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP).  Dr. Bruce Verchere’s team at the University of British Columbia describes their work in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In (un)related news, Guelph University’s genetically engineered pigs or “Enviropigs” were given the OK by Environment Canada as being non-toxic to the environment.  Now they await Health Canada’s nod before they appear in your local supermarket.

Stem Cells Don’t Mind DNA Damage: Canadian scientists have discovered that stem cells intentionally damage their own DNA in order to regulate development… continue reading the rest of the story here at the Stem Cell Network Blog.

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Friday Science Review: January 29, 2010

A productive week of international collaborations leading to new drugs or targets…

Genetic Map of Yeast: A large-scale, genome-wide interaction map of yeast genes was constructed in an international study.  The extensive network of genetic interactions lays out a functional map of the cell where similar biological processes can be grouped together. Yeast has been studied in the past and present because their molecular signaling is similar to human cells and is easy to manipulate.  The detailed “genetic atlas” in this project, a first for any organism, provides important information to better understand genetic functions in relation to diseases.  Their technique also allowed the scientists to map interactions between genes and chemicals, which will aid in choosing drug targets by predicting the extent of the interaction with other genes and how it may affect the cell.  The multi-national project was led by University of Toronto researchers Drs. Brenda Andrews and Charles Boone.  Details of the yeast map study appear in the prestigious journal, Science.

Mutations in Lymphomas: The identity of new mutations associated with specific types of lymphomas is described in this latest Nature Genetics article.  Sequencing of genes involved in the NF-kappaB signalling pathway led to the identification of recurrent mutations affecting the EZH2 histone methyltransferase enzyme.  The oncogene is the second member of this enzyme group found to be mutated in different types of cancer.  Mutations were found in over 21% of a lymphoma subtype, affecting amino acid Tyrosine 641 that renders the enzyme with lower activity.  Dr. Marco Marra at the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre (BC Cancer Agency) conducted the sequencing project.

Stopping Alzheimer’s Disease: Inhibition of ACAT1, an enzyme directly involved in cholesterol metabolism, significantly decreases the accumulation of amyloid plaques when tested in a mouse model of Alzheimer.  To gain deeper knowledge of how this works, researchers deleted the ACAT1 gene in mice predisposed to develop Alzheimer’s disease.  The brains of these mice had fewer amyloid plaques with improved cognitive function.  The key finding is that without ACAT1 function, cholesterol accumulates in a subcellular compartment of the cell where it is converted and no longer available to be involved in amyloid plaque formation.  These data supports the use of ACAT1 inhibitors in the battle against Alzheimer’s disease and lends insight into future improvement.  Dr. Nabil Seidah at the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal collaborated with researchers in the U.S. and published the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

New Treatment to Stop Malaria: Two enzymes important to the survival of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite causing malaria, have been discovered in an international collaboration aimed at stopping the drug-resistant parasite.  Malaria parasites invade red blood cells and digest the proteins for fuel to grow and divide until they burst out of the red blood cell and repeat the process again.  The discovery of the parasitic enzymes, PfA-M1 and PfA-M17, which are keys to the digestive process in red blood cells, was the first step in designing therapeutic drugs.  Building three-dimensional structures of the enzymes was the next step in determining how best to target and inhibit the enzyme.  The study suggests that blocking PfA-M1 and Pfa-M17 would prevent the parasite from feasting on the red blood cell and represents a new wave of promising anti-malarial drugs.  McGill University’s Dr. John Dalton led the international research project and is reported in this week’s The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Vitamin D fights Crohn’s Disease: Vitamin D deficiency in individuals may contribute to the development of Crohn’s disease, as suggested in this new research report.  Mismanagement of intestinal bacteria triggers an inflammatory response that develops into the autoimmune disorder.  The action of Vitamin D, as the study suggests, is to directly promote the expression of NOD2, which signals to the body of a microbial invasion.  NOD2 then activates NF-kappaB to induce expression of DEFB2 (defensin beta2), an anti-microbial peptide.  To further support Vitamin D’s role, both DEFB2 and NOD2 have been linked to Crohn’s disease in earlier studies.  This is significant to the management of the disease because Vitamin D deficiency is easy to test for through a simple blood test and Vitamin D supplements (and sunlight!) are readily available.  Dr. John White and his team at McGill University and the Université de Montréal published their study in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Friday Science Review: If you want to…

If you want to avoid malaria:  Two PLoS ONE publications by teams in Dr. Kain’s lab at the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health illuminate malaria: one by suggesting that inflammatory peptide C5a may contribute to the pathogenesis of Placental Malaria; and one showing that serum levels of angiopoietin-1 and the angiopoietin-2/1 ratio are promising clinically informative biomarkers for Cerebral Malaria.

If you want to understand schizophrenia: try gender studies? Researchers at Fernand-Seguin Research Centre of Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital studied cerebral activation in people with schizophrenia in terms of emotional processing and cognitive analysis. They show that men with schizophrenia performing the tests display cerebral activation similar to that of healthy women performing the same tests, and vice versa.

If you want to teach the world to sing: head to The University of Prince Edward Island.  UPEI received a 7 year, $2.5 million grant to take a multidisciplinary, international approach to the study of singing.  The grant will fund approaches from the point of view of music cognition, neuroscience, and cultural anthropology, and will look at such questions as the nature of singing, how to teach it better, and its health benefits.

If you want to be three times more likely to meet fitness guidelines: take the subway.*

* I know, I know.  I implied a causal relationship.  So sue me.

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