The Cross-Border Biotech Blog

Biotechnology, Health and Business in Canada, the United States and Worldwide

Tag Archives: Imperial College London

Bailout Update: UK and Canada

Two bailout developments to report yesterday:

In the UK, the science minister Lord Drayson is championing a call by Imperial College London and the universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh and Oxford to create a £1bn fund to finance the early stages of university spin-outs:

Medical research was given as an example, but Drayson is said to be pushing for the £1bn fund to finance ideas from all areas of science and engineering.

Here in Canada, the MaRS Blog posted yesterday about BIOTECanada’s Parliamentary Quarterly (pdf), which reiterates BIOTECanada’s previous bailout asks and includes some new data on the Canadian biotech industry, as well as some information on bailouts in other jurisdictions.

I would guess that some of the support apparently being generated by the UK proposal is due to the breadth of the project, with the potential to stimulate a wide range of innovative industries.  With so many common needs and challenges among biotech, cleantech and high tech, I would like to see further collaborative efforts in Canada as well.  Hopefully the Ontario Venture Capital Fund, which appears to be set up along the lines being proposed in the UK, will invest in all three areas and create a foundation for future collaboration.

Update: for some sense of common ground, see this NY Times blog post.

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Personalized Medicine: The “SNP Doctor”

BIO SmartBrief picked up a story today about a device being tested called the mohel Snip Doctor, a hand-held diagnostic device that:

looks for known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) – single letter changes in the genetic code – that can affect an individual’s response to medical treatment.

While most current approaches to personalized medicine are mechanistic (e.g., HercepTest), this device raises the possibility of a correlative approach.  Of course, it’s only a temporary measure to hold us over until our full genomes are a normal part of our electronic medical records.

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