The Cross-Border Biotech Blog

Biotechnology, Health and Business in Canada, the United States and Worldwide

Friday Science Review: September 28, 2012

Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a mainstay model organism for molecular biology, where dissection of its signaling pathways and interaction networks are used to build models that can be extrapolated to other higher organisms. Closer to home, S. cerevisiae shares many conserved features with other yeast species, such as Candida albicans, which can be opportunistic human pathogens. The virulence of C. albicans has been correlated to its ability to switch between budding yeast to filamentous forms, an ability that is shared by S. cerevisiae. Therefore, understanding the genes involved in the different morphologies of S. cerevisiae, which includes distinct forms of filamentation, can therefore lead to an increased understanding of the pathogenesis of opportunistic fungal infections – a growing problem amongst immunocompromised patients

In an international collaboration, led by the Boone lab at the University of Toronto, a global gene deletion approach was used to explore the genes required for the filamentous growth programs. In their paper published in Science, they show that unique genes appear to underlie each filamentation program, but that some key genes are important across filamentous growth. These core genes include MFG1 (YDL233w), whose gene product acts as a regulator of filamentous growth by binding to Flo8 and Mss11, transcription factors previously found to have morphogenetic roles. With the identification of MFG1 as a key regulator of filamentation, the potential for a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent the invasion of human tissues by filamentous fungal species like C. albicans arises.

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