The Cross-Border Biotech Blog

Biotechnology, Health and Business in Canada, the United States and Worldwide

Friday Science Review: September 7, 2012

This week saw the publication of two important papers on protein-protein interactions. The first paper, from a collaboration led by Andrew Emili at the University of Toronto, was published in the journal Cell and details a census of soluble protein complexes from human cells. In a second complementary paper, published in Nature and led by Jack Greenblatt also at the University of Toronto (and also involving their next door neighbours, the Emili lab), the first global, high-confidence physical interaction map of membrane proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed.

Both of these studies produced a wealth of information and provide important resources to identify candidate disease genes, as well as to predict the function of individual proteins within their respective complexes. Indeed, the human cell census identified over 300 previously un-annotated protein complexes, that comprised over 1,000 proteins, some of which are have already been linked to human disease. Similarly the membrane protein study identified more than 1,700 membrane protein-protein interactions and 500 putative protein complexes that involved a membrane protein. On this later point, it is important to remember that membrane proteins represent the majority of drug targets, but have been notoriously difficult to study due to their amphipathic nature.

In addition to the identification of new protein complexes, both papers allowed the exploration of the evolutionary conservation of protein complexes across different species that emphasizes a generally high degree of conservation, but that could ultimately reveal the dangers and limitations of using simpler organisms as models of human diseases.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 129 other followers