The Cross-Border Biotech Blog

Biotechnology, Health and Business in Canada, the United States and Worldwide

Friday Science Review: October 2, 2009

Prostate cancer and H1N1 updates…

Nanotechnology is Coming:  A research study by a group of University of Toronto engineers, nanoscientists, and pharmaceutical specialists has garnered a lot of media attention this week describing the use of nanomaterials in microchip technology to create a highly sensitive biosensor.  In the more technical report published in Nature Nantotechnology this week, they describe a special nanostructuring technique arranged in an array architechture to expand the dynamic range and sensitivity of the system for nucleic acid and protein biodetection.  The microchip is small, fast, and super sensitive.

In an earlier publication in ACS Nano, they applied their nanotechnology to detect prostate cancer biomarkers.  They demonstrated the accuracy, sensitivity and speed of the non-invasive test, which they are trying to package into a small hand-held device that can readily conduct testing at the point-of-care.  Of course, the application of this technology goes far beyond prostate cancer and can be adapted to detect other cancer biomarkers, HIV and other diseases.   Nanomaterial, nanotechnology, nanomedicine – these are hot words that you will hear about more frequently in the near future.

The research was lead by University of Toronto scientists, Drs. Shana Kelley and Ted Sargent.  A spinoff company based on the molecular diagnostic platform, tentatively called GenEplex, is in the works with the support of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research’s Intellectual Property Development and Commercialization Program.  Also, the Ontario Genomics Institute is funding a microRNA application of the technology to the tune of almost $1 million.

In other prostate cancer research news:

Targeting IGF-1R:  Researchers targeted the Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) with antisense technology to suppress IGF-1R expression in prostate cancer cells.  They found that by inhibiting IGF-1R signaling activity, the cancer cells grew more slowly but also increased their rate of cell death.  This is the first preclinical proof-of-principal that antisense therapy targeting IGF-1R in prostate cancer may be a viable treatment route and warrants further investigation.

The study was conducted by Dr. Michael Cox at the Vancouver Prostate Centre and published in this week’s editon of The Prostate.

Fatty Acids Promote Prostate Cancer: The hormone androgen, and its androgen receptor partner, have been shown to contribute to prostate cancer progression.  In this research report, researchers at the University of British Columibia suggest that elevated fatty acid (arachadonic acid) levels in the tumors may lead to increased activation of steroid hormone synthesis and contribute to the progression of the cancer.  Therefore, they recommended that fatty acid pathways should also be targeted as part of a therapeutic approach to treating prostate cancer.

Dr. Colleen Nelson led the research team at the Vancouver Prostate Centre and published the report also in this week’s edition of The Prostate.

H1N1 Update: Following last week’s “seasonal flu vs. swine flu” vaccination story, the Public Health Agency of Canada reviewed their own data and soon declared their position on the yet unpublished study saying that “there is no link between having a seasonal flu shot and developing a severe bout of pandemic flu.”  More to follow on this as the controversial study should become public next week.

In other H1N1 news:

Big Pharma gets Immunity: As increasing H1N1 cases emerge and Health Canada is being encouraged to expedite the approval of H1N1 vaccines, the Public Health Agency of Canada is following other countries in stating that they will protect GlaxoSmithKline, the maker of the vaccine, from any lawsuits arising from potential side effects.

Surgical Masks are Adequate: Healthcare workers should be encouraged by a study comparing standard surgical masks versus N95 respirator in protecting against flu viruses (swine included).  In the randomized controlled study, conducted by flu expert Dr. Mark Loeb at McMaster University, 446 nurses from eight hospitals in Ontario were equally distributed to wear either sugical masks or fit-tested N95s.  The results showed that there was an insignificant difference (23.6%, surgical mask vs. 22.9%, N95) in the number who contract the ‘flu’ during the course of the season.  However, this study is sure to raise more debate within the healthcare community as unpublished work in China found that N95 masks can cut the risk of catching the flu virus by 75% while surgical masks offer no protective effect.  Dr. Loeb’s study is published in the early edition of JAMA.   A commentary on this issue is also provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Benefits of Handwashing? And if you are not confused enough about how to avoid catching the virus, consider this article in CMAJ questioning the benefits, due to lack of scientific evidence, of hand washing in preventiing the transmission of influenza viruses.

Bookmark and Share

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 129 other followers